FEATURED POST

In the crosshairs of conscience: John Kitzhaber's death penalty reckoning

Image
To cope with his dread, John Kitzhaber opened his leather-bound journal and began to write.
It was a little past 9 on the morning of Nov. 22, 2011. Gary Haugen had dropped his appeals. A Marion County judge had signed the murderer's death warrant, leaving Kitzhaber, a former emergency room doctor, to decide Haugen's fate. The 49-year-old would soon die by lethal injection if the governor didn't intervene.
Kitzhaber was exhausted, having been unable to sleep the night before, but he needed to call the families of Haugen's victims.
"I know my decision will delay the closure they need and deserve," he wrote.
The son of University of Oregon English professors, Kitzhaber began writing each day in his journal in the early 1970s. The practice helped him organize his thoughts and, on that particular morning, gather his courage.
Kitzhaber first dialed the widow of David Polin, an inmate Haugen beat and stabbed to death in 2003 while already serving a life sentence fo…

Stays of executions last minute decision: Prasetyo

An ambulance carrying the body of one of the four executed drug convicts leaves Cilacap, Central Java on July 29, 2016
An ambulance carrying the body of one of the four executed drug convicts leaves
Cilacap, Central Java, Indonesia on July 29, 2016.
Attorney General M. Prasetyo has said the stay of execution for 10 drug convicts on Nusakambangan prison island in Cilacap, Central Java, was a last minute decision after considering various judicial and non-judicial aspects.

The decision involved the Attorney General's Office (AGO) and relevant institutions, Prasetyo said, without providing further details on the matter.

"It was decided to carry on with executions of four drugs convicts, while executions for the other 10 will be decided later and carried out at an appropriate time," Prasetyo said.

Meanwhile, the remaining 10 death-row convicts will be transferred back to their former prisons until a final decision is made, Prasetyo said.

He rejected claims that the country had halted the executions as a result of international pressure, adding that even though officials had heard many opinions, all parties should respect Indonesian law.

Freddy Budiman, Seck Osmane, Michael Titus and Humphrey Jefferson executed

Four drug convicts executed early Friday morning were big players in the drug trade, which was the basis for the government's decision to proceed with their executions amid global public outcry and local pleas for clemency, an official said on Friday.

The government executed four drug convicts Friday and spared 10 others after thorough consideration, Attorney General's Office junior prosecutor for general crimes Noor Rachmad said. Indonesian Freddy Budiman, Seck Osmane from Senegal and Nigerians Michael Titus Igweh and Humphrey Ejike were those executed.

"The four convicts were major drug dealers. For example, Freddy trafficked drugs in Jakarta, Medan, Bali and Papua," he said during a media briefing at Wijaya Pura Dock in Cilacap, Central Java, after the executions took place.

Moreover, all four convicts had appealed for judicial reviews and all had been rejected by the Supreme Court, Rochmad said.

"We conducted thorough and comprehensive consideration as to why the four inmates should be executed," he added.

The remaining 10 convicts will face further legal process, including judicial reviews, which was the reason for their executions being put on hold despite the preparations, including coffins, ambulances and funds for body transfer, being made for 14 people.

Freddy had been a notorious drug kingpin who was sent to prison on multiple drug charges. Arrested for the first time in 2009, Freddy was sentenced to death by the West Jakarta District Court for attempting to smuggle 1.4 million ecstasy pills from China into the country. He continued to control his international drug network and production despite being locked up behind bars on Nusakambangan prison island.

Meanwhile, Osmane was sentenced to death by the South Jakarta District Court for the possession of 2.4 kilograms of heroin in 2004. Nigerians Igweh and Ejike were sentenced to death for 5.8 kilograms of heroin possession in 2002 and 1.7 kilograms in 2003, respectively.

Freddy's body was taken to his hometown in Surabaya, East Java, Ejike was cremated in Banyumas while Osmani's and Igweh's bodies were handed over to representatives of their respective countries, Rochmad said.

Source: The Jakarta Post, July 29, 2016

⚑ | Report an error, an omission; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; send a submission; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running!


"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed, but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." - Oscar Wilde

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

Convicted killer from infamous “Texas 7” prison escape gets execution date

Malaysian court sentences Australian grandmother to death by hanging

Post Mortem – the execution of Edward Earl Johnson

Ohio: Lawyers seek review of death sentence for 23-year-old Clayton man

Texas man on death row for decapitating 3 kids loses appeal

Amnesty International Once Again Highlights Shocking Justice System in Iran

Maria Exposto: Can she avoid execution?

Nebraska seeks July 10 date for state's 1st execution since 1997

Ohio man with execution set for July 18 blames killing on ‘homosexual panic’

In the crosshairs of conscience: John Kitzhaber's death penalty reckoning