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America Is Stuck With the Death Penalty for (At Least) a Generation

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With Justice Anthony Kennedy's retirement, the national fight to abolish capital punishment will have to go local.
When the Supreme Court revived capital punishment in 1976, just four years after de facto abolishing it, the justices effectively took ownership of the American death penalty and all its outcomes. They have spent the decades since then setting its legal and constitutional parameters, supervising its general implementation, sanctioning its use in specific cases, and brushing aside concerns about its many flaws.
That unusual role in the American legal system is about to change. With Justice Anthony Kennedy’s retirement from the court this summer, the Supreme Court will lose a heterodox jurist whose willingness to cross ideological divides made him the deciding factor in many legal battles. In cases involving the Eighth Amendment’s prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment, his judgment often meant the difference between life and death for hundreds of death-row pr…

Sacramento preacher celebrates Orlando shootings, urges more deaths

Some of the victims of  the Orlando shooter. Who they were...
Sacramento Baptist preacher Roger Jimenez took to the pulpit hours after a mass shooting in Orlando, Florida that left 50 dead and dozens injured. But instead of words of comfort, Jimenez offered up praise for the killer and urged more killings of LGBT people.

“Are you sad that 50 pedophiles were killed today?” the pastor of Verity Baptist Church said in the sermon. “Um no, I think that’s great! I think that helps society. I think Orlando, Florida is a little safer tonight.”

“We don’t need to do anything to help. As far as I’m concerned, Orlando is a little bit safer tonight,” he said. “If we lived in a righteous government, they should round them all up and put them up against a firing wall, and blow their brains out.”

Local activist Sandrea Nelson, Pride director of the Davis-Phoenix coalition, gave a profound statement to the Sacramento Bee when asked about Jimenez’ comments from the pulpit.

“He’s not a man of God. He is not teaching religion,” he said.

Sacramento mayor Kevin Johnson also condemned Jimenez’ statements in a post on Twitter.

Video of Jimenez’s “sermon” was quickly taken down by YouTube for violating the site’s hate speech policy. 

Source: LGBTQ Nation, Bil Browning, June 14, 2016

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