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Why Texas’ ‘death penalty capital of the world’ stopped executing people

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Since the Supreme Court legalized capital punishment in 1976, Harris County, Texas, has executed 126 people. That's more executions than every individual state in the union, barring Texas itself.
Harris County's executions account for 23 percent of the 545 people Texas has executed. On the national level, the state alone is responsible for more than a third of the 1,465 people put to death in the United States since 1976.
In 2017, however, the county known as the "death penalty capital of the world" and the "buckle of the American death belt" executed and sentenced to death a remarkable number of people: zero.
This is the first time since 1985 that Harris County did not execute any of its death row inmates, and the third year in a row it did not sentence anyone to capital punishment either.
The remarkable statistic reflects a shift the nation is seeing as a whole.
“The practices that the Harris County District Attorney’s Office is following are also signifi…

Philippines: Senators won't reimpose death penalty just to accommodate next president

Some senators frowned yesterday on the idea of putting a sunset provision on the proposed restoration of the death penalty, saying lawmakers should vote on the measure based on their convictions.

Incoming Senator Panfilo "Ping" Lacson said the 17th Congress should not pass the measure reimposing the death penalty for just the 6-year duration of the incoming administration only to satisfy President-elect Rodrigo R. Duterte as he goes all out in his campaign against illegal drugs and syndicated crime.

Lacson said he does not believe reimposing the death penalty only during the 6-year term of Duterte would be feasible.

"I don't agree. The Senate is a self-respecting institution and should not legislate to please the incumbent president of the Philippines, which obviously is what will be projected to our people if we include a sunset provision limiting the effectivity of the proposed legislation on the restoration of the death penalty," Lacson said in a text message.

"My take is, either we vote for or against the measure once it reaches the Senate floor depending on our own conviction but definitely not to accommodate the President of the Republic," he said.

It was Sen. Ralph Recto who earlier proposed that death penalty be restored but only during the 6 years of the Duterte administration.

For his part, Sen. Aquilino "Koko" Pimentel III said he sees no need for a sunset provision on the measure since laws can be repealed.

"That's a novel approach, but we might open new debates about that on the constitutionality of the provisions," Pimentel said in an interview over DWIZ.

Source: Manila Bulletin, June 14, 2016

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