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Why Texas’ ‘death penalty capital of the world’ stopped executing people

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Since the Supreme Court legalized capital punishment in 1976, Harris County, Texas, has executed 126 people. That's more executions than every individual state in the union, barring Texas itself.
Harris County's executions account for 23 percent of the 545 people Texas has executed. On the national level, the state alone is responsible for more than a third of the 1,465 people put to death in the United States since 1976.
In 2017, however, the county known as the "death penalty capital of the world" and the "buckle of the American death belt" executed and sentenced to death a remarkable number of people: zero.
This is the first time since 1985 that Harris County did not execute any of its death row inmates, and the third year in a row it did not sentence anyone to capital punishment either.
The remarkable statistic reflects a shift the nation is seeing as a whole.
“The practices that the Harris County District Attorney’s Office is following are also signifi…

UAE: Alarm over requests for blood money

Lawyers and legal advocates are appalled by families who exploit the killing of a relative to demand huge sums of blood money from the perpetrator's family.

Although blood money, or diyya, is set at Dh200,000, some bereaved families have asked for millions of dirhams to overturn a death sentence for the killer.

"When a person has committed a murder and is sentenced to death, the victim's family is called in and asked 3 questions: Will you pardon the person? Will you accept Dh200,000 in exchange for a pardon? Do you insist that they be executed?" said a judge at the Abu Dhabi Judicial Department.

According to judicial officials, any amount above Dh200,000 in blood money that a family asks for is agreed to outside of court.

"Blood money is strictly set at Dh200,000, anything additional is considered compensation or reconciliation money so that the death penalty is not enforced," a judge said.

"It is a personal agreement between the 2 families, so they do not insist on the death penalty and are encouraged to pardon instead. It does not fall under the court's jurisdiction."

Lawyer Rashed Al Hajri said it was unacceptable for families to ask for huge sums of blood money, decrying that as a clear sign of greed.

"You cannot put a price on an individual or use his life as a bargaining tool to get as much money as possible. [But] it is understandable if the victim left behind young children and the family calculated the amount they would need to support these children."

Mr Al Hajri said the civil courts would determine the amount of compensation to the bereaved familes, "but to use something as big as pardoning a death sentence is not acceptable".

Lawyer Huda Al Falamarzy said she did not encourage families to ask for millions of dirhams in exchange for a pardon."Those who pardon will be rewarded by God and if they do pardon they should follow the legal course and not abuse the system by asking for millions," she said.

The law should place a limit on the amount of money that families can ask for, Ms Al???Falamarzy said.

Source: The National, April 30, 2016

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