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A Most American Terrorist: The Making of Dylann Roof

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“What are you?” a member of the Mother Emanuel AME Church in Charleston asked at the trial of the white man who killed eight of her fellow black parishioners and their pastor. “What kind of subhuman miscreant could commit such evil?... What happened to you, Dylann?”
Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah spent months in South Carolina searching for an answer to those questions—speaking with Roof’s mother, father, friends, former teachers, and victims’ family members, all in an effort to unlock what went into creating one of the coldest killers of our time.
Sitting beside the church, drinking from a bottle of Smirnoff Ice, he thought he had to go in and shoot them.
They were a small prayer group—a rising-star preacher, an elderly minister, eight women, one young man, and a little girl. But to him, they were a problem. He believed that, as black Americans, they were raping “our women and are taking over our country.” So he took out his Glock handgun and calmly, while their eyes were closed in prayer, ope…

Miami judge declares Florida's death-penalty law is unconstitutional

Florida's death chamber
Florida's death chamber
A Miami-Dade judge has ruled that Florida's death penalty is unconstitutional because jurors are not required to agree unanimously on execution - a ruling that will add to the ongoing legal debate over Florida's capital punishment system.

Circuit Judge Milton Hirsch on Monday issued the ruling in the case of Karon Gaiter, who is awaiting trial for 1st-degree murder.

Hirsch wrote that Florida's recently enacted "super majority" system - 10 of 12 juror votes are needed to impose execution as punishment for murder - goes against the long-time sanctity of unanimous verdicts in the U.S. justice system.

"A decedent cannot be more or less dead. An expectant mother cannot be more or less pregnant," he wrote. "And a jury cannot be more or less unanimous. Every verdict in every criminal case in Florida requires the concurrence, not of some, not of most, but of all jurors - every single one of them."

Hirsch's order comes with Florida's controversial death-penalty law remains very much in flux.

In January, in the case of Timothy Lee Hurst, the U.S. Supreme Court declared the state's death sentencing system unconstitutional because it gave too little power to juries. For decades, jurors only issued majority recommendations, with judges ultimately imposing the death penalty.

The high court, however, did not rule on the unanimity question. Except for Alabama and Florida, all other states that have the death penalty require a unanimous jury verdict to impose the death sentence.

Last week, the Florida Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the Hurst case, with critics of the law arguing that all 390 death row inmates should get life sentences because they were sentenced under a flawed system.

After the Hurst case was decided in January, Florida lawmakers were forced to fix the death-penalty sentencing scheme. Florida's new law requires juries to unanimously vote for every reason, known as aggravating factors, that a defendant might merit a death sentence. Whether to actually impose the death sentence requires 10 of 12 jurors.

"All of these changes inure to the benefit of the defendant," Assistant State Attorney Penny Brill wrote in a motion in the Gaiter case earlier this year. "These requirements render Florida's system constitutional under the United States Supreme Court's precedents."

Judge Hirsch, in his order, said the fixes don't matter.

"Arithmetically the difference between 12 and 10 is slight," Hirsch wrote. "But the question before me is not a question of arithmetic. It is a question of constitutional law. It is a question of justice."

Source: Miami Herald, May 9, 2016

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A Most American Terrorist: The Making of Dylann Roof