FEATURED POST

Why Texas’ ‘death penalty capital of the world’ stopped executing people

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Since the Supreme Court legalized capital punishment in 1976, Harris County, Texas, has executed 126 people. That's more executions than every individual state in the union, barring Texas itself.
Harris County's executions account for 23 percent of the 545 people Texas has executed. On the national level, the state alone is responsible for more than a third of the 1,465 people put to death in the United States since 1976.
In 2017, however, the county known as the "death penalty capital of the world" and the "buckle of the American death belt" executed and sentenced to death a remarkable number of people: zero.
This is the first time since 1985 that Harris County did not execute any of its death row inmates, and the third year in a row it did not sentence anyone to capital punishment either.
The remarkable statistic reflects a shift the nation is seeing as a whole.
“The practices that the Harris County District Attorney’s Office is following are also signifi…

Iran: 13 executions in a single day

Barbaric and medieval: Public hanging in Mashhad, Iran, on May 17, 2016
Barbaric and medieval: Public hanging in Mashhad, Iran, on May 17, 2016
Javad Larijani, the regime's head of human rights, acknowledges a "torrent of executions" and justifies torture and brutal punishments under the pretense of Qisas describing them as "holy verdicts".

The mullahs' antihuman regime hanged 13 prisoners on May 17 in the cities of Yazd, Urmia and Mashhad. In Yazd and Urmia 12 prisoners were collectively hanged. 1 prisoner had been condemned to death just for thievery.

Also in Mashhad, a young prisoner was publicly hanged. A placard posted at the hanging site described the death penalty as an "element for the survival and establishment of security in the society."

A day prior to these collective executions, Javad Larijani, the brother of the head of the judiciary and the regime's theorist of torture and execution who is the head of the so-called "human rights" institution, confirmed the "torrent of executions related to narcotics." He expressed concern that the cruel punishments of the mullahs' Sharia Law are being questioned, stating: "Regretfully, today, the Qisas verdict which is a holy verdict ... is being questioned ... the universality of the United Nations documents does not mean that the Western lifestyle is the best model ... this is exactly where we should strongly stand up." He then resorted to justifying torture, noting: Some "believe that any corporal punishment is torture, whereas torture is to use force to extract something." (State-run Aftab website, May 16)

On this same day, Abbas Jafari Dolatabadi, Tehran's criminal prosecutor, brazenly said: "Officials in Western countries always bring up allegations relating to human rights ... against Iran that lack any basis in reality."

When the medieval regime acknowledges a "torrent of executions" and describes atrocious and medieval punishments such as chopping of hands and gouging out of eyes as "holy verdicts" and justifies torture, this shows that it cannot sustain its rule for a single day without resorting to execution and suppression. This is where all factions of the mullahs' regime are one and the same, and any propaganda about a moderate faction is a despicable deception that serves to justify trade with this regime. However, without paying any heed to these absurd propaganda, the Iranian people demand nothing less than the overthrow of this regime and the establishment of democracy in Iran.

Source: NCRI, May 19, 2016

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