FEATURED POST

States to try new ways of executing prisoners. Their latest idea? Opioids.

Image
The synthetic painkiller fentanyl has been the driving force behind the nation’s opioid epidemic, killing tens of thousands of Americans last year in overdoses. Now two states want to use the drug’s powerful properties for a new purpose: to execute prisoners on death row.
As Nevada and Nebraska push for the country’s first fentanyl-assisted executions, doctors and death penalty opponents are fighting those plans. They have warned that such an untested use of fentanyl could lead to painful, botched executions, comparing the use of it and other new drugs proposed for lethal injection to human experimentation.
States are increasingly pressed for ways to carry out the death penalty because of problems obtaining the drugs they long have used, primarily because pharmaceutical companies are refusing to supply their drugs for executions.
The situation has led states such as Florida, Ohio and Oklahoma to turn to novel drug combinations for executions. Mississippi legalized nitrogen gas this s…

Singapore: Belgian accused of killing son could escape death penalty

Philippe Graffart
Philippe Graffart
A Belgian man accused of murdering his 5-year-old son in Singapore could be spared from hanging if he pleads guilty to an amended charge, state prosecutors said Wednesday.

Philippe Graffart, 42, was charged with the murder of his son Keryan at an upmarket condominium in October 2015 but has been found to be suffering from severe depression.

Murder is punishable by death through hanging in Singapore, but Graffart would instead face a maximum term of 10 years and caning should he plead guilty to an amended charge of culpable homicide under the Singapore penal code.

"The accused suffered from major depressive order which substantially impaired his mental state at the time of the offence," the Attorney-General's Chambers told AFP in reply to a query.

"The charging and sentencing position will be made clear when the matter is heard in open court."

Execution by hanging dates back to British colonial rule in Singapore and is applied to convicted murderers and drug traffickers. There is no other form of execution in the city-state.

Graffart's lawyer Ramesh Tiwary said his client was "still very depressed about what happened".

The Belgian, a former finance executive who has been in remand since his arrest in October hours after the killing, did not appear in a district court on Wednesday during a pre-trial session because he was unwell, Tiwary said.

He said the next pre-trial conference on the case is scheduled for March 29.According to Singapore media reports, Graffart's son was found strangled in his bedroom with hand-shaped bruises around his neck.

The father was believed to have been fighting for the boy's custody with his ex-wife at the time.

Graffart's account on business networking service LinkedIn before his arrest described him as an executive director and head of fund distribution in the Asia-Pacific region for Oslo-based Nordea Investment Management

Source: asiaone.com, March 23, 2016


- Report an error, an omission: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com - Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

Nebraska: Omaha attorney signs on to help fight Jose Sandoval's execution

North Carolina prosecutors want the death penalty for prison inmates accused of killing officers

Florida Governor Rick Scott continues death penalty fight with State Attorney Aramis Ayala

States to try new ways of executing prisoners. Their latest idea? Opioids.

Bali jailbreak: US inmate escapes notorious Kerobokan prison

Saudi Arabia On Track To Execute The Most People This Year In Two Decades

Texas: For first time in more than 30 years, no Harris County death row inmates executed

California: Woman who murdered spouse for insurance sentenced to death

South Carolina prosecutor wants execution drug law 14 years after ambush

Indonesia: Death row inmate caught trafficking drugs inside prison, prosecutor asks he get death penalty, again