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No Second Chances: What to Do After a Botched Execution

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Ohio tried and failed to execute Alva Campbell. The state shouldn't get a second chance.
The pathos and problems of America's death penalty were vividly on display yesterday when Ohio tried and failed to execute Alva Campbell. Immediately after its failure Gov. John Kasich set June 5, 2019, as a new execution date.
This plan for a second execution reveals a glaring inadequacy in the legal standards governing botched executions in the United States.
Campbell was tried and sentenced to die for murdering 18-year-old Charles Dials during a carjacking in 1997. After Campbell exhausted his legal appeals, he was denied clemency by the state parole board and the governor.
By the time the state got around to executing Campbell, he was far from the dangerous criminal of 20 years ago. As is the case with many of America's death-row inmates, the passage of time had inflicted its own punishments.
The inmate Ohio strapped onto the gurney was a 69-year-old man afflicted with serious ailm…

One of Jakarta blasts masterminds is convict on death row: Police

One of the masterminds behind terror attacks on Jakarta in January was a convict on death row, Indonesian police revealed on Friday.

JAKARTA: One of the masterminds behind a series of terror attacks that hit Jakarta on Jan 14 is a convict on death row, Iwan Kurniawan or Rois, Indonesian police told reporters on Thursday (Mar 3), adding Bali, an airport and an international school in the capital had also been considered targets.

Currently, Rois is awaiting his sentence for his role in the 2004 bombings at the Australian embassy in Jakarta.

Since the brazen assault in Thamrin business district, more than 40 suspects have been arrested; six of them are directly linked to the gunfire and bombings that killed eight people, including the four terrorists.

“The network was coordinated by him from prison. The money flowed to somebody - I’m not going to say who that person – to somebody out of prison, but under the control of Iwan Rois,” Jakarta police chief Tito Karnavian disclosed during talks on the terrorism network in Southeast Asia at the State Islamic University in the capital.

Besides Rois, police also believe that Aman Abdurrahman, another terror convict currently in prison, had also played a part in the January attacks.

The police chief admitted one of the country's weaknesses is its prison system. "They are put together in the same prison. Then they can communicate. They can make plots for attacks. They can reorganise and regroup."

One of the terror suspects arrested had contemplated attacking the popular resort of Bali, an unidentified airport and an international school in Jakarta, according to on-going investigations.

Following the incident, the Islamic State (IS) militant group claimed responsibility for the attacks. According to terrorism expert Prof Rohan Gunaratna from S Rajaratnam School of International Studies in Singapore, the bombings are a prelude to IS's declaration of its planned caliphate in Indonesia.

However, the Philippines seems more likely to witness the first of such caliphate in Southeast Asia, the expert said.

“In the Philippines, four groups came together and identified themselves as IS. So IS will make a declaration," he explained. "In the case of Indonesia, currently there is a discussion going on as to what groups will form the IS branch.”

However, no broad consensus on unified support for the militant group has been reached in Indonesia. Moreover, its radical groups remain divided. About 24 of such groups have pledged their allegiance to IS while others - particularly those with former members of al-Qaeda-linked Jemaah Islamiyah - have rejected the IS ideology.

Still, these radical groups share the same ultimate goal, which is to create an Islamic state in the region.

Source: Channel News Asia, March 4, 2016

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