FEATURED POST

Trial by Fire - Did Texas execute an innocent man?

Image
The fire moved quickly through the house, a one-story wood-frame structure in a working-class neighborhood of Corsicana, in northeast Texas. Flames spread along the walls, bursting through doorways, blistering paint and tiles and furniture. Smoke pressed against the ceiling, then banked downward, seeping into each room and through crevices in the windows, staining the morning sky.
Buffie Barbee, who was eleven years old and lived two houses down, was playing in her back yard when she smelled the smoke. She ran inside and told her mother, Diane, and they hurried up the street; that’s when they saw the smoldering house and Cameron Todd Willingham standing on the front porch, wearing only a pair of jeans, his chest blackened with soot, his hair and eyelids singed. He was screaming, “My babies are burning up!” His children—Karmon and Kameron, who were one-year-old twin girls, and two-year-old Amber—were trapped inside.
Willingham told the Barbees to call the Fire Department, and while Dia…

Missouri House Budget committee approves breaking out fund for executions

Missourians and future legislators would be able to see where in the state budget is the money that pays for executions, under a change approved by the House Budget Committee.

The Committee approved putting money for Missouri's executions in a separate budget line - it used to come out of an expenses and equipment fund. The change means now it can be seen how much the state sets aside to pay for executions.

It also means future lawmakers who oppose the death penalty could propose pulling funding for it, though as long as a Republican majority controls the legislature such an effort would be unlikely to pass.

It would cover cash payments to the maker of the drug used in Missouri's lethal injection process and to the anonymous members of the execution team, and potential IRS penalties the state could incur for not giving those team members tax forms to report that payment.

It was sponsored by Representative Jeremy LaFaver (D-Kansas City). He opposes the death penalty, but says this is just about transparency.

"On something this important - taking a human life away from somebody - it is important enough for the taxpayers of this state to know this is the line in the budget that pays for it," said LaFaver.

The change received bipartisan support, including from several Republicans who support the death penalty.

Representative Scott Fitzpatrick (R-Shell Knob) said he had no problem it.

"I'm always in favor of breaking things out so it is more transparent and we know how money's being spent. I don't see any harm being done by this," said Fitzpatrick. "And quite frankly if there are penalties from the IRS there's a line to pay for them now."

The committee put $40,000 into that fund - enough to pay for 1 execution.

Source: missourinet.com, March 1, 2016

- Report an error, an omission: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com - Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

Nevada law says chief medical officer must advise on executions despite ethical clash

Russian who joined ISIS in Iraq sentenced to hanging

Ohio executes Gary Otte

20 Minutes to Death: Record of the Last Execution in France

Iran: Prisoners Hanged in Public While Crowd Watched

Arkansas death-row inmate tries to drop appeal blocking execution; request denied

Poorly executed - Indiana inmate challenges state's lethal cocktail change

Trial by Fire - Did Texas execute an innocent man?

Nevada inmate asks how he should mentally prepare for execution

"I cannot execute convicted murderers," Tanzania's president declares