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The Blissful Ignorance of American neo-Nazis

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The violent white supremacist rally in Charlottesville reflects the dangerous, vicious, open-the-floodgates culture that having a Bully-in-Chief in the White House has created in America.
Hundreds of protesters descended upon Charlottesville, Virginia, on August 12, 2017 for a “Unite the Right” rally. 
The rally was dispersed by police minutes after its scheduled start at noon, after clashes between rallygoers and counter-protesters, and after a torchlit pre-rally march Friday night descended into violence.
But later that day, as rallygoers began a march and counterprotests continued, a reported Nazi sympathizer drove a car into a crowd of counterprotesters, killing one and injuring 19.
Self-described “pro-white” activist Jason Kessler organized the rally to protest the planned removal of a statue of confederate general Robert E. Lee from a park in Charlottesville. 
Kessler is affiliated with the alt-right movement that uses internet trolling tactics to argue against diversity and “id…

Missouri House Budget committee approves breaking out fund for executions

Missourians and future legislators would be able to see where in the state budget is the money that pays for executions, under a change approved by the House Budget Committee.

The Committee approved putting money for Missouri's executions in a separate budget line - it used to come out of an expenses and equipment fund. The change means now it can be seen how much the state sets aside to pay for executions.

It also means future lawmakers who oppose the death penalty could propose pulling funding for it, though as long as a Republican majority controls the legislature such an effort would be unlikely to pass.

It would cover cash payments to the maker of the drug used in Missouri's lethal injection process and to the anonymous members of the execution team, and potential IRS penalties the state could incur for not giving those team members tax forms to report that payment.

It was sponsored by Representative Jeremy LaFaver (D-Kansas City). He opposes the death penalty, but says this is just about transparency.

"On something this important - taking a human life away from somebody - it is important enough for the taxpayers of this state to know this is the line in the budget that pays for it," said LaFaver.

The change received bipartisan support, including from several Republicans who support the death penalty.

Representative Scott Fitzpatrick (R-Shell Knob) said he had no problem it.

"I'm always in favor of breaking things out so it is more transparent and we know how money's being spent. I don't see any harm being done by this," said Fitzpatrick. "And quite frankly if there are penalties from the IRS there's a line to pay for them now."

The committee put $40,000 into that fund - enough to pay for 1 execution.

Source: missourinet.com, March 1, 2016

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