FEATURED POST

States to try new ways of executing prisoners. Their latest idea? Opioids.

Image
The synthetic painkiller fentanyl has been the driving force behind the nation’s opioid epidemic, killing tens of thousands of Americans last year in overdoses. Now two states want to use the drug’s powerful properties for a new purpose: to execute prisoners on death row.
As Nevada and Nebraska push for the country’s first fentanyl-assisted executions, doctors and death penalty opponents are fighting those plans. They have warned that such an untested use of fentanyl could lead to painful, botched executions, comparing the use of it and other new drugs proposed for lethal injection to human experimentation.
States are increasingly pressed for ways to carry out the death penalty because of problems obtaining the drugs they long have used, primarily because pharmaceutical companies are refusing to supply their drugs for executions.
The situation has led states such as Florida, Ohio and Oklahoma to turn to novel drug combinations for executions. Mississippi legalized nitrogen gas this s…

Delaware capital murder trials and hearings halted while state justices mull death penalty law

A Superior Court judge has halted all trials and penalty hearings in capital murder cases while Delaware's Supreme Court mulls the constitutionality of the state's death penalty law.

The order was issued Monday President Judge Jan Jurden, head of the Superior Court system.

Last week, the Supreme Court accepted several questions submitted by a Superior Court judge regarding the roles of judges and juries in Delaware death penalty cases. 

Those questions were prompted by a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling.

The U.S. Supreme Court said Florida's death sentencing scheme was unconstitutional because a jury, not a judge, must find each fact necessary to impose a death sentence.

Delaware's sentencing scheme is similar to Florida's.

Meanwhile, a bill to abolish Delaware's death penalty was defeated in the state House last week.

Source: Associated Press, Feb. 1, 2016


First State freezes all death penalty cases

Superior Court President Judge Jan Jurden is halting all 39 of Delaware's pending death penalty cases as the state's highest court weighs the system's constitutionality.

The official stay from Jurden comes just days after another Superior Court judge asked the Delaware Supreme Court to rule on the legality of the state's capital punishment program.

Part of the First State's system resembles Florida's, which the U.S. Supreme Court struck down as unconstitutional last month.

In Delaware, juries have to unanimously find at least 1 aggravating factor to recommend a death sentence. Then, a judge weighs all relevant information that came out at trial before either sentencing that person to die or giving them life in prison.

All but 1 Supreme Court justice found putting more power in the hands of judges unconstitutional in their recent ruling.

State lawmakers in the House rejected a bill that would overturn capital punishment in Delaware altogether last week.

The Public Defender's Office and the state will file arguments to the Delaware Supreme Court in the coming weeks, with a ruling expected before the summer.

Source: Delaware Public Media, Feb. 1, 2016

- Report an error, an omission: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com - Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

Nebraska: Omaha attorney signs on to help fight Jose Sandoval's execution

Florida Governor Rick Scott continues death penalty fight with State Attorney Aramis Ayala

North Carolina prosecutors want the death penalty for prison inmates accused of killing officers

States to try new ways of executing prisoners. Their latest idea? Opioids.

Texas: For first time in more than 30 years, no Harris County death row inmates executed

Saudi Arabia On Track To Execute The Most People This Year In Two Decades

California: Woman who murdered spouse for insurance sentenced to death

Indonesia: Death row inmate caught trafficking drugs inside prison, prosecutor asks he get death penalty, again

Bali jailbreak: US inmate escapes notorious Kerobokan prison

South Carolina prosecutor wants execution drug law 14 years after ambush