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No Second Chances: What to Do After a Botched Execution

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Ohio tried and failed to execute Alva Campbell. The state shouldn't get a second chance.
The pathos and problems of America's death penalty were vividly on display yesterday when Ohio tried and failed to execute Alva Campbell. Immediately after its failure Gov. John Kasich set June 5, 2019, as a new execution date.
This plan for a second execution reveals a glaring inadequacy in the legal standards governing botched executions in the United States.
Campbell was tried and sentenced to die for murdering 18-year-old Charles Dials during a carjacking in 1997. After Campbell exhausted his legal appeals, he was denied clemency by the state parole board and the governor.
By the time the state got around to executing Campbell, he was far from the dangerous criminal of 20 years ago. As is the case with many of America's death-row inmates, the passage of time had inflicted its own punishments.
The inmate Ohio strapped onto the gurney was a 69-year-old man afflicted with serious ailm…

Sister Helen Prejean hands Richard Glossip letter to Pope Francis (video)

Sister Helen Prejean comments on meeting Pope Francis in Rome and giving him a thank-you letter from Oklahoma death-row inmate Richard Glossip.





Click here for more information on the Richard Glossip case

Source: YouTube, January 21, 2016


Still fighting the death penalty, Sister Prejean gets pope’s blessing

Richard Glossip and Sister Helen Prejean
Richard Glossip and Sister Helen Prejean
VATICAN CITY (RNS) Two decades after her anti-death penalty work was transformed into an Oscar-winning movie, “Dead Man Walking,” Sister Helen Prejean’s campaign continues with the backing of Pope Francis.

Prejean met with the pope on Thursday (Jan. 21) to deliver a thank-you letter from Richard Glossip, whose execution in the U.S. was halted in September after intervention from the pontiff [and , essentially, an execution drugs mix-up that led Gov. Fallin to stop the execution in extremis and reluctantly declare a temporary stay on all executions scheduled in Oklahoma -- DPN].

But her celebratory meeting with the pontiff came just hours after another death row inmate, Richard Masterson, was put to death in Texas.

“I said, ‘They killed him.’ And he (Francis) lowered his eyes and said, ‘I pray, I pray.’ He really feels for people on death row,” Prejean recalled.

Masterson was convicted for killing Darin Honeycutt in 2001, although the defense team argued that the victim died of a heart attack during consensual sexual relations.

The pope had been following the case closely, Cardinal Christoph Schonborn said on Monday.

Francis voiced his opposition to capital punishment while addressing Congress in September. “Recently my brother bishops here in the United States renewed their call for the abolition of the death penalty,” he said. “Not only do I support them, but I also offer encouragement to all those who are convinced that a just and necessary punishment must never exclude the dimension of hope and the goal of rehabilitation,” Francis told lawmakers.

Prejean remains hopeful in the case of Glossip, convicted of hiring a man to kill a motel owner. His execution was indefinitely postponed after it was discovered that the wrong drug had been presented for the lethal injection.

The execution was stayed by Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin, who received a letter from the Vatican’s top U.S. diplomat, Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, urging her to save Glossip’s life on behalf of the pope.

“I sensed his innocence from the beginning. I’m with the seventh person on death row; three of the seven have been innocent — that’s how broken the thing (system) is.”

More than 150 people have been released from death row since 1973, following evidence of their innocence, according to the Death Penalty Information Center. Executions are disproportionately high in Southern states and people are more likely to be sentenced to death if their victim is white.

Pope Francis adresses the U.S. Congress in Sept. 2015
Pope Francis adresses the U.S. Congress in Sept. 2015
Campaigning equally for those who are guilty and innocent, Prejean argued that those on death row feel deep remorse and should not be executed for one act. Discussing a particular case, she said a man asked for forgiveness and admitted to being so high on drugs he had no memory of the crime.

The nun’s fight against capital punishment began in the 1980s, when she became a spiritual adviser to Patrick Sonnier, who was put to death in Louisiana. Prejean presented the pope with a Spanish copy of the book based on her experiences, “Dead Man Walking,” which was turned into a film for which Susan Sarandon won an Oscar for her role as Sister Helen.

Prejean said she felt compelled to act after witnessing Sonnier’s execution and realized the U.S. public could not see the reality of the death chamber.

“I came out and I vomited. I’d never watched a human being be killed, that I knew, and I remember thinking it was very clear: People are never going to get close to this.”

Before discussing capital punishment it is important to talk to people about the crime scene itself, she said.

“If you don’t go to that place and let them know you feel the outrage too, they’ll never be able to come over with you finally to the place where they can have compassion for the person (convicted).”

Prejean said Francis’ influence and support are never far away.

“The pope’s like a little lighthouse, and he keeps sending out that beam — this is what it’s about.”

Source: RNS, Rosie Scammell, January 21, 2016

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