FEATURED POST

Why Texas’ ‘death penalty capital of the world’ stopped executing people

Image
Since the Supreme Court legalized capital punishment in 1976, Harris County, Texas, has executed 126 people. That's more executions than every individual state in the union, barring Texas itself.
Harris County's executions account for 23 percent of the 545 people Texas has executed. On the national level, the state alone is responsible for more than a third of the 1,465 people put to death in the United States since 1976.
In 2017, however, the county known as the "death penalty capital of the world" and the "buckle of the American death belt" executed and sentenced to death a remarkable number of people: zero.
This is the first time since 1985 that Harris County did not execute any of its death row inmates, and the third year in a row it did not sentence anyone to capital punishment either.
The remarkable statistic reflects a shift the nation is seeing as a whole.
“The practices that the Harris County District Attorney’s Office is following are also signifi…

Fresh concerns for Saudi juveniles after mass execution

Dawoud al-Marhoon
Dawoud al-Marhoon
Three Saudi juveniles remain at grave risk of execution, international human rights NGO Reprieve has warned, as fresh details emerged of the cases of several young protestors who were executed on Saturday.

Ali Saeed al-Rebh and Mohammad Faisal al-Shioukh, two protestors who were teenagers when they were arrested in 2012, were among 47 prisoners executed across Saudi Arabia on Saturday (2nd). They were killed alongside a third young man, Mohammad Suweimal, and the prominent activist Sheikh Nimr.

It’s now been revealed that Ali, who 18 at the time of his arrest, was in school when he was arrested by police officers for attending protests. He was later subjected to torture, including being burnt with cigarettes and beaten, before being sentenced to beheading in the country’s secretive Specialized Criminal Court (SCC). The charges that included helping to organise demonstrations with a mobile phone and attending an address given by Sheikh Nimr.

Mohammed, who was 19 when he was arrested, was convicted in the same court on charges including chanting against the Saudi government and painting anti-establishment graffiti on walls. A ‘confession’ he signed after being beaten with electric cables and batons was used to secure his death sentence.

Following Saturday’s mass execution, three juveniles are still awaiting execution – Ali al-Nimr, Dawoud al-Marhoon and Abdullah al –Zaher. All three, who are held in solitary confinement, were tortured into signing statements that were used to convict and sentence them to death in the SCC. Speaking last month, Abdullah al-Zaher’s father, Hassan al-Zaher, said that the court process had been so secretive that the family had been unable to follow the progress of their son’s trial. He appealed to the international community to “please help me save my son from the imminent threat of death.”

Speaking yesterday, Foreign Office Minister Tobias Ellwood said the UK government had “expressed our disappointment” at the executions to the Saudi authorities, adding that ministers would “continue to raise” the cases of the juveniles.

Commenting, Maya Foa, head of the death penalty team at Reprieve, which is assisting the juveniles, said: “With the executions of young protestors who were tortured and convicted in secret trials, the Saudi authorities have demonstrated utter contempt for the rule of law, basic human rights and their international obligations. There are now serious concerns that juveniles Ali al-Nimr, Dawoud al-Marhoon and Abdullah al-Zaher could be next in line for the swordsman’s blade. Saudi Arabia’s closest allies – the UK and the US included – must do all they can to bring an end to this wave of killings.”

Source: Reprieve, January 4, 2016

- Report an error, an omission: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com - Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

North Carolina death row becoming frail, aging

Trump calls for death penalty for anyone who kills a police officer

Nebraska: Omaha attorney signs on to help fight Jose Sandoval's execution

Bali jailbreak: US inmate escapes notorious Kerobokan prison

California: Riverside County leads U.S. in death penalty sentences, but hasn’t executed anyone in 39 years

States to try new ways of executing prisoners. Their latest idea? Opioids.

Georgia executes Emmanuel Hammond

Iran: Two Prisoners Hanged In Public

Law of Parties: Prosecutor who put Jeff Wood on Texas’ death row asks for clemency

Why Texas’ ‘death penalty capital of the world’ stopped executing people