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Anthony Ray Hinton Spent Almost 30 Years on Death Row. Now He Has a Message for White America.

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Anthony Ray Hinton was mowing the lawn at his mother's house in 1985 when Alabama police came to arrest him for 2 murders he did not commit. One took place when he was working the night shift at a Birmingham warehouse. Yet the state won a death sentence, based on 2 bullets it falsely claimed matched a gun found at his mother's home. In his powerful new memoir, "The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row," Hinton describes how racism and a system stacked against the poor were the driving forces behind his conviction. He also writes about the unique and unexpected bonds that can form on death row, and in particular about his relationship with Henry Hays, a former Klansman sentenced to death for a notorious lynching in 1981. Hays died in the electric chair in 1997 - 1 of 54 people executed in Alabama while Hinton was on death row.
After almost 30 years, Hinton was finally exonerated in 2015, thanks to the Equal Justice Initiative, or EJI. On April 27…

Bill to End Death Penalty Introduced in Kansas

The Senate chambers in the Kansas Statehouse.
The Senate chambers in the Kansas Statehouse.
Today, a group of 17 legislators, led by former judge, Representative Steven Becker, introduced a bill in the Kansas House of Representatives that would end the death penalty in Kansas. 

This group of 11 Republicans and 6 Democrats cosponsored Bill 2515, which would repeal the death penalty and replace it with a maximum punishment of Life Without Parole.

This group of legislators plans to speak on the matter and address the media at 11:45 a.m. on Thursday, January 28th in the 2nd Floor Capitol Rotunda. 

They will be joined by recent exoneree, Floyd Bledsoe, who will also speak about his story and what happens when the justice system does not work as it should. 

Come join us all as we listen to these leaders speak about the practical and moral reasons to end the death penalty.

Bill 2515

- This bill would save Kansas taxpayers millions of dollars over the next 10 years and would continue saving money into the future. The bill designates these savings to be captured and allocated to the budget-starved Department of Corrections.

- This bill would also prevent Kansas from committing the gravest injustice thinkable -- sentencing an innocent person to death.

- Finally, this bill would put Kansas on the right side of history, joining 18 other states, and the VAST majority of developed nations, by ending the morally bankrupt practice of executing its own citizens.

Source: KCADP, January 22, 2016

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Anthony Ray Hinton Spent Almost 30 Years on Death Row. Now He Has a Message for White America.