FEATURED POST

Capital Punishment in the United States Explained

Image
In our Explainer series, Fair Punishment Project lawyers help unpackage some of the most complicated issues in the criminal justice system. We break down the problems behind the headlines - like bail, civil asset forfeiture, or the Brady doctrine - so that everyone can understand them. Wherever possible, we try to utilize the stories of those affected by the criminal justice system to show how these laws and principles should work, and how they often fail. We will update our Explainers monthly to keep them current. Read our updated explainer here.
To beat the clock on the expiration of its lethal injection drug supply, this past April, Arkansas tried to execute 8 men over 1 days. The stories told in frantic legal filings and clemency petitions revealed a deeply disturbing picture. Ledell Lee may have had an intellectual disability that rendered him constitutionally ineligible for the death penalty, but he had a spate of bad lawyers who failed to timely present evidence of this claim -…

Arizona faces more difficulty finding execution drugs

The Arizona Department of Corrections again faces a likely shortage of drugs for executions by lethal injection.

All executions have been on hold in Arizona since July 2014, when murderer Joseph Wood was put to death in Florence. Despite warnings by defense attorneys, the Corrections Department used an experimental process using a Valium-like drug called midazolam in combination with a narcotic.

It did not go as planned. The executioner administered 15 times the supposed lethal dose before Wood died. Wood spent nearly two hours gasping and snorting on the execution gurney.

Judge Neil Wake, who has long ruled in favor of the Department of Corrections on execution protocols, afterward placed a moratorium on executions in the state.

On Tuesday, in a status conference in U.S. District Court in Phoenix, Wake said that litigation could go forward on whether to resume executions.

The state had hoped to continue to use the drug midazolam in a different combination. But an Arizona assistant attorney general informed Wake that the state’s supply of that drug has an expiration date of late May, and the Department of Corrections has not yet been able to obtain more from other sources.

The attorneys who brought suit against the state’s lethal injection procedures said that the case and its appeals will not likely be finished by that May expiration date.

After the Wood execution, the Federal Public Defender’s Office in Phoenix brought suit against the state in Wood’s name and on behalf of five death row prisoners facing imminent execution. A law firm from Los Angeles joined the suit, as did the First Amendment Coalition of Arizona, an association of nearly 20 newspapers and broadcast outlets, including The Arizona Republic.

The suit not only seeks to define the parameters of execution in Arizona, but also to provide more access to the media and the public.

Arizona, like most states, strictly guards the identities of its drug sources.

In 2010, The Republic reported that Arizona and other states were illegally importing the standard execution drug, sodium thiopental, from Europe. Since then, pharmaceutical firms, many of which are in Europe, have refused to supply drugs to American prisons for use in executions. Executions are illegal in many European countries, and no one in those countries is allowed to assist in executions elsewhere.


Source: azcentral, Michael Kiefer, January 12, 2016

- Report an error, an omission: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com - Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Most Viewed (Last 30 Days)

Harris County leads Texas in life without parole sentences as death penalty recedes

Idaho County commissioners take stand against death penalty

Texas: Reginald Blanton executed

30-year-old Chinese inmate bids farewell to daughter, wife and mother before execution

USA: Executions, Death Sentences Up Slightly in 2017

Indonesian death penalty laws to be softened to allow reformed prisoners to avoid execution

Death penalty cases of 2017 featured botched executions, claims of innocence, 'flawed' evidence

Virginia Governor commutes death sentence of killer found mentally incompetent to be executed

5 worrying things we’ve learned from new Saudi execution numbers

Texas man with scheduled execution uses letters from fellow death row inmates to argue for reprieve