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This is America: 9 out of 10 public schools now hold mass shooting drills for students

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How "active shooter" drills became normal for a generation of American schoolchildren.
"Are you kids good at running and screaming?" a police officer asks a class of elementary school kids in Akron, Ohio.
His friendly tone then turns serious.
“What I don’t want you to do is hide in the corner if a bad guy comes in the room,” he says. "You gotta get moving."
This training session — shared online by the ALICE Training Institute, a civilian safety training company — reflects the new normal at American public schools. As armed shooters continue their deadly rampages, and while Washington remains stuck on gun control, a new generation of American students have learned to lock and barricade their classroom doors the same way they learn to drop and roll in case of a fire.
The training session is a stark reminder of how American schools have changed since the 1999 Columbine school shooting. School administrators and state lawmakers have realized that a mass shoot…

Unfair trials lead to death-row convictions in Indonesia

Corrupt legal system, poor investigations 'work against the innocent'

Many prisoners in Indonesia on death row are there as a result of unfair trials, according to an Indonesian church official.

"Lots of people are still waiting for their execution. Many of them are the fruit of unfair trials," said Father Paulus Christian Siswantoko, secretary of the bishops' Commission for Justice, Peace and Pastoral for Migrant-Itinerant People, during a Dec. 13 discussion program at the bishops' conference's office in Jakarta.

"If those sentenced to death are finally executed and then research is done after their execution that shows they are victims of unfair trials, the state cannot do anything to pay for its sins," he said.

"This is something that we must reveal, we must tell the public. We must see that trials are not always fair," he said.

Father Siswantoko referred to the case of a 54-year-old Catholic layman named Christian, who was arrested in November 2007 on drug trafficking charges, convicted and later sentenced to death.

The bishops' Advocacy and Human Rights Forum are trying to help secure the man's release. Father Siswantoko said he was convicted on false evidence and received an unfair trial.

Azas Tigor Nainggolan, forum coordinator, said Christian, who is being held in Tangerang prison in Banten province, had a name that was similar to a known drug dealer wanted by police, who did follow proper investigatory procedures.

"Christian was not arrested at the crime scene and was never asked for a urine test, which is essential in drug-related cases," he told ucanews.com.

He said the forum was preparing to submit a judicial review for Christian's case and request clemency.

Nainggolan said that Indonesia's legal system remained corrupt. "This can be seen from unfair trials. And it would be very heavy if unfair trials have to be faced by those sentenced to death," he said.

He said the forum has uncovered at least 300 death penalty convictions that were the result of unfair trials.

Meanwhile, Talitha Kara, Christian's daughter, said her family hopes justice will prevail.

"We just want the state to enforce the law. I want my father to be sent home. That's all," she told ucanews.com.

Source: ucanews.com, December 14, 2015

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