FEATURED POST

'Express lane to death': Texas seeks approval to speed up death penalty appeals, execute more quickly

Image
Texas is seeking to speed up executions with a renewed request to opt-in to a federal law that would shorten the legal process and limit appeals options for death-sentenced prisoners.
Defense attorneys worry it would lead to the execution of innocent people and - if it's applied retroactively, as Texas is requesting - it could potentially end ongoing appeals for a number of death row prisoners and make them eligible for execution dates.
"Opt-in would speed up the death penalty treadmill exponentially," said Kathryn Kase, an longtime defense attorney and former executive director of Texas Defender Services.
But a state attorney general spokeswoman framed the request to the Justice Department as a necessary way to avoid "stressful delays" and cut down on the "excessive costs" of lengthy federal court proceedings.
Robbie Kaplan, co-founder of the #TimesUp movement, says sweeping changes to laws in recent years have dissuaded attorneys from taking on har…

Japan lawyers' group slams 'inhumane' death penalty, calls for suspension, national debate

Gallows at Tokyo Detention Center, Japan
Gallows at Tokyo Detention Center, Japan
The Japan Federation of Bar Associations on Wednesday condemned capital punishment as "inhumane" and called on Justice Minister Mitsuhide Iwaki to set up an panel of experts to review the policy.

It said the body should start a national debate about a practice already abandoned in Europe and elsewhere.

The lawyers' group, an influential body representing Japan's legal profession, said the panel should include people for, against and neutral toward the death penalty.

The secrecy surrounding executions in Japan has been criticized at home and abroad, with neither death row inmates nor their lawyers and families given advance notice executions, which take place by hanging.

It is also unclear what criteria authorities use in deciding when inmates are to be executed, as some remain on death row for years.

Making its case, the group noted that 140 countries have abolished the death penalty by law or in practice as of the end of 2014. It also cited a recommendation by the U.N. Human Rights Committee that urged Japan to "give due consideration to the abolition of the death penalty."

The group said: "The death penalty is one of the most important human rights problems facing Japan."

Moreover, it called for a suspension of executions while the nation debates the policy.

"We have called for public debate over the abolition of capital punishment," the group said. "It is because the death penalty is an inhumane punishment and it eliminates the possibility of rehabilitating those who commit crimes."

It added: "Trials always carry a risk of misjudgment, and if a wrong judgment leads to capital punishment, it cannot be corrected."

Source: Japan Times, December 9, 2015

- Report an error, an omission: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com - Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

Iran: Execution Of A Sports Coach In Hamadan

Warden Describes Life on Texas Death Row in Delacruz Testimony

20 Minutes to Death: Record of the Last Execution in France

Alabama executes Walter Moody

California has over 700 people on death row and executions could begin soon

Number of Beheadings in Saudi Arabia Rises by 70%

California death row inmate to be freed; no retrial planned

Texas death row inmate slated for execution Wednesday denied clemency

Oklahoma Officials Endorse Nitrogen Executions As 'Humane,' But Some Medical Experts Aren't Sure

Aging death row: Is executing old or infirm inmates cruel?