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Oklahoma | Doctor paid $15,000 each time death penalty carried out, $1,000 a day for participating in training leading up to executions

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Oklahoma pays a doctor $15,000 per execution for duties that include performing a consciousness check and verifying death during the lethal injection process. A top corrections official testified about the payments Monday during a hearing in Oklahoma City federal court. The doctor, who was not identified, does not administer the 3 drugs used to carry out the death penalty in Oklahoma. The doctor and an IV team, however, are involved in verifying the drugs are correct and in placing the IV lines. Justin Farris, the chief of operations at the Oklahoma Corrections Department, recruited the doctor last year. He said the doctor also is paid $1,000 a day for participating in training leading up to executions.  That training usually takes place once a week and twice on the week an execution is scheduled, according to his testimony. The hearing Monday involved a request by two inmates for execution stays. RELATED | Oklahoma death row inmates seek firing squad as alternative Donald A. Grant is

Confusion over Nebraska's execution drugs

OMAHA, Neb. —New questions are arising about Nebraska's effort to obtain the drugs needed to execute prisoners on death row.

Federal sources stated that the Drug Enforcement Administration and Food and Drug Administration said they have no idea what Nebraska officials are referring to when discussing that they're 'working with' Federal Agencies.

Gov. Pete Ricketts said during an October news conference that the state is working with the DEA, trying to get execution drugs from India.

Agents in St. Louis said that no one had spoken to Nebraska about this and officials at the DEA headquarters stated that nothing has changed, like they said weeks ago, the DEA will not approve the importation of this drug.

The governor's corrections director also told state senator's that he is working with the Food and Drug Administration, but a senior-level official in the agency's headquarters said the only word that matters is the court order blocking sodium thiopental importation.

Corrections spokesperson Dawn-Renee Smith is now attempting to clarify Ricketts' and Frakes' words:

"'Working with' simply means that we are still in the process of obtaining the chemicals and completing any necessary steps required by the DEA and/or the FDA."

The state indicated that it has taken some new action within the last week.

Source: KETV, David Earl, November 27, 2015

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