FEATURED POST

Trial by Fire - Did Texas execute an innocent man?

Image
The fire moved quickly through the house, a one-story wood-frame structure in a working-class neighborhood of Corsicana, in northeast Texas. Flames spread along the walls, bursting through doorways, blistering paint and tiles and furniture. Smoke pressed against the ceiling, then banked downward, seeping into each room and through crevices in the windows, staining the morning sky.
Buffie Barbee, who was eleven years old and lived two houses down, was playing in her back yard when she smelled the smoke. She ran inside and told her mother, Diane, and they hurried up the street; that’s when they saw the smoldering house and Cameron Todd Willingham standing on the front porch, wearing only a pair of jeans, his chest blackened with soot, his hair and eyelids singed. He was screaming, “My babies are burning up!” His children—Karmon and Kameron, who were one-year-old twin girls, and two-year-old Amber—were trapped inside.
Willingham told the Barbees to call the Fire Department, and while Dia…

WINDOWS ON DEATH ROW: Art From Inside and Outside the Prison Walls

Untitled (Blue Cell), ink on paper, 9" x 11 5/8” by  Armando Macias
Untitled (Blue Cell), ink on paper, 9" x 11 5/8” by Armando Macias
Images can trigger conversations, sometimes far better than words. Internationally known political cartoonist Patrick Chappatte and journalist Anne-Frederique Widmann have come together to organize a one of a kind exhibition, entitled WINDOWS ON DEATH ROW: Art From Inside and Outside the Prison Walls.

The exhibition will feature over 60 works of some of the most famous American political cartoonists as well as artworks drawn from a more unlikely source, death row inmates. By presenting a variety of perspectives, from both inside and outside of the prison walls, Chappatte and Widmann hope to stimulate conversation on an issue that touches politics, race, morality, and the question of equality under the law.

WINDOWS ON DEATH ROW will run from October 22 - December 18, 2015, at the University of Southern California (USC) Annenberg School of Communication. The exhibition space will span both the site’s first floor and mezzanine gallery areas. It will include educational materials and interactive displays that will allow viewers to engage directly with the complex and challenging subject matter.

Using art as a tool for social awareness, this exhibition will open a window into an often hidden part of the ongoing conversation about capital punishment - exploring the system through the eyes of the incarcerated. At a moment when our country is becoming ever more polarized regarding racial injustice and economic inequality, these questions that the exhibition raises could not be more timely.

Chappatte and Widmann also reached out to victims organizations. Murders Victims’ Families for Human Rights (MFVHR), the largest victims association in the USA, is sponsoring the project.

Click here to visit the website

Source: WINDOWS ON DEATH ROW, October 12, 2015

Report an error, an omission: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

Iran: Three Hand Amputations, Four Hangings Carried Out in Qom

Iran: Woman Asylum Seeker Lashed 80 Times After Being Deported From Norway

Trial by Fire - Did Texas execute an innocent man?

Iran: Three executions carried out, two in front of large crowds

Gambia: President Barrow Signs Abolition Of Death Penalty Treaty

Two Myanmar migrants make final appeal in Koh Tao murder case

Judge warns death row inmate to keep Nevada's execution manual secret

Texas Child Killer John Battaglia Found Competent for Execution

Iran: More Public Executions, Prisoner Hanged While Crowd Watched

Poorly executed - Indiana inmate challenges state's lethal cocktail change