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Trial by Fire - Did Texas execute an innocent man?

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The fire moved quickly through the house, a one-story wood-frame structure in a working-class neighborhood of Corsicana, in northeast Texas. Flames spread along the walls, bursting through doorways, blistering paint and tiles and furniture. Smoke pressed against the ceiling, then banked downward, seeping into each room and through crevices in the windows, staining the morning sky.
Buffie Barbee, who was eleven years old and lived two houses down, was playing in her back yard when she smelled the smoke. She ran inside and told her mother, Diane, and they hurried up the street; that’s when they saw the smoldering house and Cameron Todd Willingham standing on the front porch, wearing only a pair of jeans, his chest blackened with soot, his hair and eyelids singed. He was screaming, “My babies are burning up!” His children—Karmon and Kameron, who were one-year-old twin girls, and two-year-old Amber—were trapped inside.
Willingham told the Barbees to call the Fire Department, and while Dia…

Nebraska Death Penalty Petition Deadline

Gathering pro-DP signatures in Nebraska, USA
Gathering pro-DP signatures in Nebraska, USA
Come November 2016, Nebraskans may be able to vote for the death penalty if the group Nebraskans for the Death Penalty gather enough signatures before the Thursday deadline. The petition is in hopes to get the issue back in the hands of the voters. Thus, the group's circulators has been soliciting signatures that will support the death penalty for about 80 days now.

The Nebraskans for the Death Penalty say this week they are working hard. They believe the vast majority of Nebraskans want the death penalty back.

Spokesman for Nebraskans for the Death Penalty, Chris Peterson says, "We've collected signatures from every corner of Nebraska and I think that speaks volumes as to the level of support to every corner of the state as we look towards the future weather or not we will keep the death penalty in our state."

However, everyone is not stopping to sign the petition. One Lincoln resident who did not sign the petition, Phil Lewiston, says, "For me it doesn't make financial sense.. it doesn't make moral sense so I choose not to sign."

Spokeswoman for Nebraskans for Public Safety, Danielle Conrad says, "No matter what happens with this referendum campaign we are really in a no lose situation. Either we will be successful and keeping this issue off the ballot so we can move on to better and other priorities for our state. Or we will have a huge jump start on a general election campaign where we know we will be competitive where we are confident our position will carry the day."

The group says they need 57 thousand registered voters' signatures to put the issue on the ballot in 2016. As of now, the signatures are being tallied in a secret location. The group will not share how many people have signed the petition.

Peterson also says, "Really the last day to sign is Tuesday. Wednesday morning we might collect a few signatures but our focus is really turning towards organizing those petitions to turn them in."

Once it's all done, it will take about 40 days for County Clerks to verify the validity of the signatures. The official numbers will come out in October from the Secretary of State's Office.

Source: NBC Nebraska, August 24, 2015

Report an error, an omission: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com

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