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USA | Lethal Injection’s Dreadful Failures: How States Are Trying to Normalize Accidents

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Editor’s Note: This column is the product of a research collaboration with five Amherst College students, Mattea Denney, Nicolas Graber-Mitchell, Greene Ko, Rose Mroczka, and Lauren Pelosi. In a column last month, I argued that over the last decade the lethal injection paradigm decomposed as new drugs and drug cocktails were adopted in death penalty states. As this happened, the number of problems encountered during executions multiplied. Of all the techniques used to put people to death in the United States since the start of the twentieth century, by 2010 lethal injection already had shown itself to be the most problematic . Since then, things have only gotten worse As lethal injection mishaps multiplied, death penalty states did not sit idly by . Over the last decade, they responded in two ways . My research collaborators and I found that while some states modified their execution procedures to make mishaps less likely, others introduced greater ambiguity and discretion into their

Brunei introduces stoning, flogging, amputation among new sharia punishments

Public flogging in Iran,
another Sharia country
The Sultan of Brunei has announced tough new Islamic punishments as part of a new sharia penal code.

The punishments, which would only apply to Muslims, include death by stoning for adultery, flogging for drinking alcohol, and severing of limbs for theft.

Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah said the new laws would be enforced from April next year.

"It is because of our need that Allah the almighty, in all his generosity, has created laws for us, so that we can utilise them to obtain justice," the monarch said.

The oil-rich kingdom has been working for several years to introduce the new code.

The 67-year-old sultan has presided over a shift to more conservative Islam and anti-sedition laws in recent years, and said sharia criminal law should be established to work alongside the country's civil law more prominently.

Brunei already enforces Islamic teachings more sternly than its neighbours Malaysia and Indonesia.

Evangelism of other religions and the sale of alcohol is strictly forbidden.

"Brunei is showing its feudal characteristics as an 18th-century state rather than an important member of a regional South East Asian economic and social consensus in the 21st century," said Phil Robertson, deputy Asia director at Human Rights Watch.

The kingdom, with a population of just over 400,000, has been ruled by the monarchy for six centuries.

Sources: AFP/Reuters, October 22, 2013

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